St Stephens Anglican Church, Fillmore, California

News from St. Stephens

"I was glad when they said unto me, We will go into the house of the Lord."

— Psalm 122:1

The Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity

Sunday September 17, 2017 is The Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity

Services are held: Sunday, at 10 a.m.

(Please Call (805) 524-1697 or e-mail rlhammond4764@hotmail.com for further information and location.

The Collect for the Fourteenth Sunday after Trinity

Almighty and everlasting God, give unto us the increase of faith, hope, and charity; and, that we may obtain that which thou dost promise, make us to love that which thou dost command; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Sunday Lectionary

Epistle: Galatians 3:5, page 209
Gospel: St. Luke 17:11, page 209

You will find the text of these lessions as well as the Collect of the Day, the minor propers and sermons at Lectionary Central.


Church Terminology

Gospel Side

That side of the Altar from which the Gospel is read, the right of the Priest as he faces the congregation, for the right side is always the position of the higher honor. In ecclesiastical architecture, called the north side, whether literally so or not.
Grace
Gradine Another name for Retable. A Retable is a shelf at the rear of the Altar on which are placed Altar Cross, vases for flowers and candlesticks.

Grace

 (1) The divine influence which operates in men to regenerate and sanctify them, often spoken of as the Grace of God, or of our Lord or of the Holy Spirit, or as imparted through the Sacraments. (2) The invocation of divine blessing before eating.

Gradine

Another name for Retable. A Retable is a shelf at the rear of the Altar on which are placed Altar Cross, vases for flowers and candlesticks.


Facebook Page For St. Stephens

facebookVisit the St. Stephens facebook page by clicking of the icon at the left.
 


ACA Web Site

Anglican Church in AmericaThe Anglican Church in America, the ACA, has a new web address: http://www.anglicanchurchinamerica.org. If you have bookmarked the ACA web site in your web browser, you should consider updating it to this address.

CONTINUING CHURCHES PLAN JOINT SYNODS

The leaders of four Continuing Anglican Churches have announced plans for Joint Synods to meet in Atlanta, Georgia, the week of October 2nd to 6th. At the conclusion of the week it is the intention of the Churches to sign an agreement establishing full communion (communio in sacris) among the four bodies as well as a pledge to pursue in a determined and deliberate fashion increasingly full unity. The Churches also will discuss common plans for mission and evangelism. Each Church will hold its own mandatory business meetings and Synods, but the four will join together throughout for common worship and social occasions.The four Churches and their episcopal leaders are the Anglican Church in American (Brian Marsh), the Anglican Catholic Church (Mark Haverland), the Anglican Province of America (Walter Grundorf), and the Diocese of the Holy Cross (Paul Hewett). (Read more on the ACA website by clicking on the shield above.)


Be a beacon of His love and redeeming power, to a world dark and in pain.

Remember

"Small numbers make no difference to God. There is nothing small if God is in it."

Your prayers are important and do make a difference. If you know of anybody who is interested in being part of building Christ's Body, within a traditional Anglican Church, please tell them about St.Stephens and ask them to contact me. I would be pleased to call on anyone who might be interested.

If you have any pastoral requests or needs, please contact me, at (805) 524-1697 or at rlhammond4764@hotmail.com

Your Servant in Christ

Fr. Bob Hammond


Food for Thought

"The true character of ministry is a servant's heart."

— Author Unknown

Forgiveness Written in Stone

A story is told of two friends who were walking through the desert. During some point of the journey they had an argument, and one friend slapped the other one in the face. The one who got slapped was hurt, but without saying anything, wrote in the sand, "Today my best friends slapped me in the face."

They kept on walking until they found an oasis, where they decided to take a bath. The one who had been slapped got stuck in the mire and started drowning, but the friend saved him. After he recovered from nearly drowning, he wrote on a stone, "Today my best friend saved my life."

His friend asked him, "After I hurt you, you wrote in the sand and now, you write on a stone, why?" The other friend replied "When someone hurts us we should write it down in sand where winds of forgiveness can erase it away. But, when someone does something good for us, we must engrave it in stone where no wind can ever erase it."

So real forgiveness keeps on leaving the sins of others and our hurts in the past. Yet Jesus understands the difficulty of such forgiveness. To keep on forgiving is a God-like characteristic. It is contrary to human nature. So He gives a parable beginning in v.23 which will help us obey His commandment to keep on forgiving.

— Stephen Felker, How Often Should I Forgive?

Two Million Dollar Mistake

John D. Rockefeller built the great Standard Oil empire. Not surprisingly, Rockefeller was a man who demanded high performance from his executives. One day, one of those executives made a two million dollar mistake. Word of the man's enormous error quickly spread throughout the executive offices, and the other men began to make themselves scarce, not wanting to cross his path. One man didn't have any choice, however, since he had an appointment with the boss. So he straightened his shoulders and walked into Rockefeller's office. As he approached Rockefeller's desk, he looked up from the piece of paper on which he was writing. "I guess you've heard about the two million dollar mistake our friend made," he said abruptly. "Yes," the executive said, expecting Rockefeller to explode. "Well, I've been sitting here listing all of our friend's good qualities, and I've discovered that in the past he has made us many more times the amount he lost for us today by his one mistake. His good points far outweigh this one human error. So I think we ought to forgive him, don't you?"

— Dale Galloway, You Can Win with Love, in The Tale of the Tardy Oxcart, Charles Swindoll, Word Pub., p. 215.

What God Can Do with Forgiveness

By the grace of God we can use forgiveness as a positive, creative force bringing light into a darkened world. Nobody does that kind of thing better, of course, than God. Who could imagine 2,000 years ago that the symbol of the Christian church would be a hangman's noose, an electric chair, a guillotine? Those analogies may be necessary for us to keep from being too sentimental about "the old, rugged cross." A cross is a terrible thing. It was indeed a symbol of suffering and shame. Humanity nailed God's own Son on a cross. What barbarity! What unspeakable evil! Yet God turned that cross into the means by which you and I may find our salvation. That is what God can do with forgiveness. What can you do?

— King Duncan, Collected Sermons, www.Sermons.com

Good things as well as Bad

Good things as well as bad, you know, are caught by a kind of infection. If you want to get warm you must stand near the fire: if you want to be wet you must get into the water. If you want joy, power, peace, eternal life, you must get close to, or even into, the thing that has them. They are not a sort of prize which God could, if He chose, just hand out to anyone. They are a great fountain of energy and beauty spurting up at the very centre of reality. If you are close to it, the spray will wet you: if you are not, you will remain dry. Once a man is united to God, how could he not live forever?

— C.S. Lewis from Mere Christianity. Compiled in Words to Live By

Posted 16 September 2017 at 1056 pdt